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Prevent The Moisture, Prevent The Problems

Updated: Nov 11



Introduction

If your house is damp and musty, it's probably time to read this article. Maintaining a healthy humidity level in your home can be the key to preventing mold growth and the serious health problems that come along with it.


When it comes to homes, moisture is the enemy. It can cause serious health risks, mold, mildew and even structural damage to your home.

When it comes to homes, moisture is the enemy. It can cause serious health risks, mold, mildew and even structural damage to your home. You need to do everything in your power to prevent moisture from building up in your house and causing problems. Fortunately, there are some easy steps you can take that will prevent this from happening.

Moisture can come from many different sources, such as humidity or rain leaking into your home through cracks in the foundation or walls of the house itself. Maintaining good ventilation will help get rid of any excess moisture so that it doesn't have time to build up inside where it could do more damage than just making things feel damp around the house; however no matter how much ventilation there is, if water gets into cracks then there's still going to be an issue with mold growing whenever possible - which means they'll eventually make their way into places you don't want them too!


Keeping your house dry and well-ventilated is the best way to prevent a mold problem from starting or getting worse. The following tips can help you keep indoor humidity in check:

Keeping your house dry and well-ventilated is the best way to prevent a mold problem from starting or getting worse. The following tips can help you keep indoor humidity in check:

  • Keep indoor humidity below 60%. A good rule of thumb is to keep it lower than the outside weather forecast for your region. In general, if both temperatures are above 65°F, you need less air conditioning; if both temperatures are below 50°F, you need more heating.

  • Ventilate after cooking or bathing. If possible, open a window for five minutes to make sure moisture doesn't build up in your home after an activity like these that produces large amounts of water vapor. You should also use exhaust fans when doing laundry and take showers instead of baths whenever possible—since they use less water than baths do.

  • Use gas heaters instead of wood-burning fireplaces and stoves because they don't require as much ventilation as traditional fireplace systems do (but be sure not to leave them on unattended). Also look into using passive solar heating systems for your home instead of furnaces since these can reduce energy consumption significantly by using natural sunlight rather than electricity from utility companies (and installation costs tend not exceed $2000 per unit).


Check for plumbing leaks, including leaky faucets and showers. Have a professional plumber fix any leaks if you find them.

If you want to be proactive, the first thing you should do is inspect your plumbing for leaks. This includes checking faucets and sinks, as well as showers. If you find leaks, call a professional plumber for help in repairing them. If you cannot afford to hire a plumber, try to repair the leak yourself.

Often times when people say they have leaky pipes, it is actually just condensation from the water hitting cold pipes that causes this problem. To avoid this from happening in your home, follow these steps:

  • Keep all shower curtains and tub mats away from hot water pipes so that any steam does not go into those areas where it could cause condensation on those surfaces;

  • Give yourself some time before entering an area with wet walls or floors if it has been raining heavily outside (this includes basements with sump pumps);

  • Make sure that any air vents are not located near high moisture areas like laundry rooms/laundry closets/bathrooms etc.;


Keep your indoor humidity below 60 percent (ideally between 30 and 50 percent). If necessary, use dehumidifiers, air conditioning or exhaust fans to reduce humidity levels. To measure humidity, use a hygrometer (an inexpensive instrument available at hardware stores).

  • Measure your indoor humidity. If you suspect that you have a moisture problem, buy an inexpensive hygrometer (available at hardware stores) or use one of the many free smartphone apps that measure humidity.

  • Keep your indoor humidity below 60 percent (ideally between 30 and 50 percent). If necessary, use dehumidifiers, air conditioning or exhaust fans to reduce humidity levels. To measure humidity, use a hygrometer (an inexpensive instrument available at hardware stores).

  • Use humidifiers if necessary to raise the indoor relative humidity to below 60 percent; however, remember that humidifiers can also cause mold growth if not used correctly!


Ventilate after cooking and bathing. Using an exhaust fan can help prevent excess moisture from remaining in your kitchen or bathroom. Vent fans should be vented to the outside (not into an attic or crawl space).

Ventilate after cooking and bathing. Using an exhaust fan can help prevent excess moisture from remaining in your kitchen or bathroom. Vent fans should be vented to the outside (not into an attic or crawl space). They should not be used for air conditioning.


Use gas heaters instead of wood-burning fireplaces and stoves. If wood burning is necessary, be sure to vent outdoor air into the room when using fireplaces and unvented space heaters. Avoid using kerosene heaters indoors because they produce high levels of indoor air pollution, including CO (carbon monoxide), nitrogen dioxide, fine particles and sulfur dioxide [CDC].

Limit the use of fireplaces and stoves to areas with adequate ventilation. If you use a kerosene heater, do not operate it indoors or in any enclosed space, including cars. Kerosene heaters produce high levels of indoor air pollution [EPA].

If you don't have access to gas heaters or if you choose not to use one:

  • Use a fan when possible instead of turning up the thermostat. The fan will make you feel cooler without raising your energy bills or increasing your risk for carbon monoxide poisoning from using an unvented wood stove or fireplace [EPA].

  • Keep windows open as much as possible when using a wood-burning furnace or stove for heat. An exception is if winds are blowing snow into houses through open windows; then close those windows!

Conclusion

If you follow these tips, you’ll be well on your way to preventing mold and mildew in your home. Once they start growing, it can be difficult to get rid of them completely. However, keeping moisture levels low will prevent any additional damage from occurring. If you’re still having trouble with mold or mildew growth in your house, it might be time for some professional help!

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